Log in

Login to your account

Username *
Password *
Remember Me



Documents

Created Date Thursday, 22 June 2017
Modified Date Tuesday, 03 July 2018
Filesize 603 Kilobytes

Effective Process Improvement Direction

Process Opportunity Ranking Based on Performance

A Key Issue Today with Process Improvement

By Frank Kowalkowski, President Knowledge Consultants, Inc.

How can we increase the likelihood of success on process projects? Determining the path of process improvement has always been a questionable effort. Techniques include many of the well-known methods such as quantitative approaches based on performance parameters as well as more qualitative approaches based on management interests, focus groups of workers and indirect measures such as customer complaints. Each has some benefits and drawbacks.

To read more, register to this web site to download the article.

Created Date Tuesday, 17 May 2016
Modified Date Tuesday, 03 July 2018
Filesize 197 Kilobytes

Fix, Rip or Replace - Leveraging Process Improvement Efforts

Process improvement techniques have been evolving

What is it about fixing process es that is difficult ? Why did we not get the outcomes from our process improvement efforts that we expected? Often the comment is made that the process effort was over budget, late and cost too much. Studies show that a high percentage of process projects (up to 75%) fail due to one or more reasons such as over budget, beyond schedule and did not return expected value. That t hey did not return expected value is really critical . A project can be late or over budget but if it returns high value the lateness and budget are forgotten. A key reason for the value issue is that there are limited applications of analytics to process analysis that do diagnostics an d discovery of opportunities . Along with this is a clear and consistent way of documenting the processes.

Many processes are documented in an ‘ Ad Ho c’ manner . This me ans that the documentation varies in format and content due to a large variety of graphic capabilities in modern tools . The variety and lack of a standard documentation notation makes it difficult to do comparative and other types of diagnostic analysis. T he problem is not with the tools but with the documentation met hods used by organization.

To read more, register to this web site to download the article.

Created Date Tuesday, 16 February 2016
Modified Date Tuesday, 03 July 2018
Filesize 289 Kilobytes

Is it a Map, Model, Both or Neither

By Frank Kowalkowski, President Knowledge Consultants, Inc.

Is there a right way to prepare a process diagram? There are many books and papers about what is the best way to diagram a process, what symbols to use, how to connect processes, what the BPMN2 standard is about, how to elicit process requirements, applying simulation for improvement or the more traditional observation method all very useful. There are few books or articles that really show how the various styles and types of maps and models fit and connect together. The relationship of various layers and scopes of processes, why you do them and how they connect together is what is important. The intent of this paper is to describe the difference between a process map and a process model. Other types of process diagrams and their use will be described in future papers. These descriptions are not a standard (except where noted) nor are they universally agreed to, however they do represent current discussions and ideas.

To read more, register to this web site to download the article.

Created Date Tuesday, 16 February 2016
Modified Date Tuesday, 03 July 2018
Filesize 314 Kilobytes

Policy Governance Management’s ‘Wicked’ Problem

The ‘Wicked’ Problem

Wicked problems for management? I thought all management problems were wicked, some more so than others. In reality many problems that management deals with have very clean and specific solutions often as part of formulas such as inventory replenishment, economic value added, return on investment, process cycle time and many hundreds more. Even predictive analytics is a known solution. The problems that are truly wicked are those that have no real answer but have just one answer that looks better than another. It would be useful to have a means of increasing the odds that we pick the better of a set of answers.

What is consistent about the description of wicked problems is the changing nature of the components of the problem and the difficulty in getting a stable or static snapshot of what is going on. This first showed up in government policy management. It shows up in other organizations because they are larger, more complex and they deal with changing issues outside the organization that impact its direction (strategy) and operation (execution) so that best performance is not achieved.

To read more, register to this web site to download the article.

Created Date Friday, 17 April 2015
Modified Date Tuesday, 03 July 2018
Filesize 364 Kilobytes

Process Analytics - Choosing Process Improvement Direction Part 1- Process Opportunity Ranking Based on Performance

Editor’s note: This is Part 1 of a three part series.

The business analysis issue:

Business analysis has received much attention lately with an expectation of some improvement in the enterprise. For example, process improvement, one of the more popular business improvement initiatives has achieved both success and failure. Success has usually been as part of another initiative such as quality improvement, Six Sigma types of projects. Failures have been more prominent in stand-alone process improvement projects. Studies indicate that up to 75% of process projects end in failure of some sort. The reasons cited are that the schedules are not met, budgets are exceeded, deployment is not successful, the performance is not met or the scope of improvement is not met.

To read more, register to this web site to download the article.

Created Date Friday, 17 April 2015
Modified Date Tuesday, 03 July 2018
Filesize 367 Kilobytes

Process Analytics - Choosing Process Improvement Direction Part 3: Balancing Process Yield with Risk

Editor’s note: This is Part 3 of a three part series.

The yield versus risk proposition: So far both yield and complexity (risk) have been analyzed. The real value of this type of analysis is to use the two perspectives together to get a ranking of processes in terms of the greatest yield with the least risk. Of course, management interests will always override these considerations but at least the degree of risk and yield are known for the deviation. In this part we bring the two perspectives together. Process analysis is not like physics where things are precisely known. Often the numbers relating to process execution vary according to the stability of the process. A machine based process might be very stable while a customer service process might vary considerably. The difference is usually in the variety of inputs and results from the process. Single input and single output are very predictable especially for machine output and assessing quantity and quality of the output. When it comes to variations in input and output, more measure variance exists between outputs. The process then has a variable set of performance parameters that need to be averaged. In Part 1 this was assumed so there is no need to worry about it here, but we need to be aware of the situation if we are to change the process.

To read more, register to this web site to download the article.

Created Date Friday, 17 April 2015
Modified Date Tuesday, 03 July 2018
Filesize 1.19 Megabytes

Process Analytics - Understanding Process Context Part 2: Process risk based on context analysis of complexity

Editor’s note: This is Part 2 of a three part series.
Business analysis and process context:

In business analysis a process is often analyzed for its internal complexity. A large process with many connections is more complex than a process with few connections. Working with such complexity is well known. There is another kind of complexity that is less known and has a large impact on the success of a process project. That complexity is defined by the number and types of touch points in the enterprise. In process change consider that the larger the quantity of touch points, the greater the risk of failure. Touch points means any point that the process contacts and interacts with the different components (or dimensions) of the business. This would include locations, other processes, organizations, decisions, systems, data bases and so on. In enterprise analysis there are over 25 different categories of components that are of concern to the analyst. Fortunately only six or seven of them are used in day-to-day analysis work. So, process context in the more general case includes internal process complexity because you can look at the interactions of processes along with the interactions of the process with the rest of the enterprise.

To read more, register to this web site to download the article.

Created Date Thursday, 17 November 2016
Modified Date Tuesday, 03 July 2018
Filesize 84 Kilobytes

Process Automation and Productivity

Getting to Smart Processes

Adding Intelligence to Processes for Productivity

By Frank Kowalkowski, President Knowledge Consultants, Inc.

Anticipating the next stage in process evolution
Right now one of the largest contributors to the digital enterprise is the Internet of Things (IoT). Businesses are talking about the ‘digital enterprise’. Digitizing the enterprise is not just adding new software and technology, it is about enabling processes to increase the positive impact on the organization results. That makes digitization key to process automation. There is considerable value currently latent in many processes. Smart processes release that value. The number one issue is when and where to apply automation through digitization to free up that value. Understanding the options and tools available to help the automation effort is what gives an organization the edge to succeed in the competitive marketplace..

To read more, register to this web site to download the article.

Created Date Friday, 17 April 2015
Modified Date Tuesday, 03 July 2018
Filesize 1.15 Megabytes

Strategic Feedback and Enterprise Process Performance

Using Correlation for Impact Analysis

The ultimate measure of enterprise performance is in the financial measures that management sets for the enterprise. Understanding what performance variables impact the financial performance and how those variables impact each other, is not a simple task. Determining the degree to which they impact the performance and what execution processes are behind the performance issue requires in--depth analysis.

The point of this paper is to illustrate how measures of process performance impact strategic performance indicators (KPIs) and how to identify these impact relationships. In this paper, seven core steps are provided to assess enterprise performance using impact assessment. Some examples are provided to illustrate the steps with possible deliverables as a an analyst might go through them.

To read more, register to this web site to download the article.

Created Date Wednesday, 22 July 2015
Modified Date Tuesday, 03 July 2018
Filesize 360 Kilobytes

The 5 Stage Process Methodology

Effectively Managing the Process Effort

By Frank Kowalkowski, President Knowledge Consultants, Inc.

The Process Project Need Today
How can you assure that a process project leads to a satisfying conclusion? Will it deliver what is expected? Will you get more than just a pile of documentation? In fact, just what is expected of a process change project?

Managers know that processes are critical to business performance and transformation today. Processes change with the changes in business direction and needs. Accommodating change is a key element of business execution today. Process change, performance, maintenance and improvement are the keys in business excellence and transformation today. Effective that change in processes requires that a method be used that links the need for change to actually deploying the correct change. Ripple effects of poor deployment results in lost performance and added cost and even lost competitive position with unhappy customers. The end result is the deployment of an inadequate process change followed by a need to correct the problems.

To read more, register to this web site to download the article.

Created Date Wednesday, 22 July 2015
Modified Date Tuesday, 03 July 2018
Filesize 76 Kilobytes

The Future of Policies and Procedures

By: Frank Kowalkowski President Knowledge Consultants, Inc.

The Issue with policies and procedures
There are few standards for P&P resulting in a number of formats and methods used to manage the typical P&P suite a business uses. Today you can buy a suite of P&P and use word processing to customize them into a set you need. This is great if you are a small business or a new business or both. But, does this fit the future? Is it good enough for an ongoing medium or large sized enterprise that has a need for good quality governance? Fortunately there are a number of newer ways to apply and manage policies and procedures today.

Because technology changed at a fast rate, enterprises are now in various stages of managing their P&P. Some have traditional P&P, some are electronic, some are in document management systems and some are being revised based on developments in the business process management (BPM) space. Still others are advancing into the newer world of executable and intelligent processes with embedded rules related to P&P.

To read more, register to this web site to download the article.

Created Date Wednesday, 15 April 2015
Modified Date Tuesday, 03 July 2018
Filesize 93 Kilobytes

The Key Techniques of Process Improvement

Process improvement techniques have been evolving

Every organization has some form of process improvement program in effect today. Some of these are enterprise wide and some are focused on key or mission critical processes. Most are somewhere in between. Some are driven by new technologies, new applications and new strategic direction, objectives, goals and initiatives. Some of these projects come from applying management disciplines like balanced scorecard or value streams, agile process techniques, value chain the Rummler –Brache approach to process change or one of the other 50+ disciplines. Whatever the approach, few are well versed in the techniques of process improvement. Most organizations fall back on two approaches:

1. Use a consultant to facilitate or actually do the process effort
2. Buy a tool and have the vendor teach you their methodology for using the tool

Both of these put the responsibility outside the organization. It is not surprising the studies show that 75% of process projects are a failure in some way. They may be over budget, take too long, become too complicated, fail to deliver results or actually implement the wrong process. This last one, implementing the wrong process is usually done at the expense of user productivity. So what can be done about this?

To read more, register to this web site to download the article.